The Clam Farm

Today, the Kosrae Peace Corps. team took a field trip to the one and only Clam Farm in Kosrae.

Two full-time clam farmers Tulin and Arnold greeted the three of us at the farm located in Lelu. Both men have worked at Clam farm for more the 10 years. They are experienced in scuba diving to locate the claims, breeding and caring for the creatures. They encouraged the three of us to take a self-guided tour of the farm. Throughout the farm are rows of shallow, rectangular open cement tanks scattered with multiple varieties of clams. Water from the ocean continuously pumps through the tanks to keep the claims in comfortable habitat.

 

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Photo By Jasmin Taylor, Peace Corps M81

The colors of the claims varied in each tank. Some had florescent blue and purple flesh while others were brown and tan. These clams looked way too beautiful to eat but Tulin did admit that he enjoys these creatures as a tasty snack. I personally don’t think I would be able to stomach such a magnificent animal, which takes five years to grow four inches in diameter, a decent eatable size.

After looking at the different tanks of clams, we asked Tulin about the breading process of the clams. He described his trips scuba diving in Pohnpei to find mating candidates, and told us about the spawning processes of two clams.

I enjoyed how enthusiastic the men where to answer our questions about clam spawning. He also mentioned that just this week the team shipped of a batch of healthy clams to Europe to be sold in aquariums. I asked how much these clams were sold  for but the men didn’t know. But, I would image that the plane ticket for a 50 or more clams from the tiny island of Kosrae to Europe make these beauties worth a pretty penny.

I would recommend the site to visitors, entrance is free and walk-ins are welcome. I look forward to visiting the clam farm again.

 

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